Our 2011 Tomatoes

Baker Creek

Gajo De Melon Tomato TS129  $2.50
Imagine melons, imagine sugar, mix in some tomato, and you describe the delicious taste of this lovely cherry tomato. They are pink and yellow, blended and marbled together, in lovely melon tones. Plants produce these gourmet fruit well.
Tess’s Land Race Currant TM156  $2.25
Deliciously flavored currant tomato that originated from Maryland’s southern shore. The tiny fruit of this variety vary in color; most are deep red but some are also rose, gold and yellow. The flavorful fruit are popular with chefs and home gardeners. The sprawling vines produce clusters of these intense tasting miniatures.
Yellow Brandywine Tomato TO102  $2.00
Superbly rich and delicious-tasting large fruit. The golden variety gives good yields, and fruit are better tasting in our opinion than Pink Brandywine. Large potato leaf plants are very sturdy & deep green. This heirloom is delicious anyway you eat it!
Omar’s Lebanese Tomato TK118  $2.50
Huge pink fruit, can grow as large as 3-4 lbs.! One of the largest tomatoes you can grow. The mammoth fruit have a superb flavor; sweet, perfect tomato taste. Good yields on vigorous plants; good tolerance to disease; a rare family heirloom from Lebanon. Perfect for anyone who wants to grow huge, tasty tomatoes.
Pearson Tomato TM118  $2.00
Determinate, 80-90 days. This tomato was one of the most popular varieties in California in the 1950’s. Excellent yielder in hot, semi-arid areas; produces large red, globular fruits that are very solid and perfect for canning!
Costoluto Genovese Tomato TM210  $2.00
The fluted, old Italian favorite that has been around since the early 19th century. Fruit are rather flattened and quite attractive
with their deep ribbing. This variety is a standard in Italy for both fresh eating and preserving; known for its intensely flavorful,
deep red flesh. This variety has also became very popular with chefs in this country.
Great White Tomato TW101  $2.50
Large 1-lb. giant creamy white fruit; this tomato is superbly wonderful. The flesh is so good and deliciously fruity, it reminds one of a mixture of fresh cut pineapple, melon and guava. One of our favorite fresh eating tomatoes! Fruit are smoother than most large beefsteak types, and yields can be very high. This fine variety was developed by Gleckner’s Seedsmen.
Purple Calabash Tomato TP125 $2.50
85 days. May be the most purple of all “purple” tomatoes; a deep purple/burgundy and very colorful! The shape is also exciting, with the 3” fruit being very flat, ribbed and ruffled. Flavor is intense, sweet and tart, with a lime or citrus taste. A most uniquely flavored tomato! The plants give huge yields. This tomato resembles tomatoes pictured in 16th-century herbal diaries.
Thessaloniki Tomato TM101  $1.50
60-80 days. The Greek tomato that was introduced to the USA in the 1950’s by Glecklers Seedsmen of Ohio. It is a popular large, red uniform fruit with excellent flavor, high yields and disease resistance. An early variety perfect for home or market; keeps well.
Amish Paste TM126  $2.50
Many seeds savers believe this is the ultimate paste tomato. Giant, blocky Roma-type tomatoes have delicious red flesh that is perfect for paste and canning. World class flavor and comes from an Amish community in Wisconsin.
Illini Gold TO116  $2.25
Beautiful, golden-orange, roma type fruit and heavy production make this the perfect processing and market variety. Meaty tomatoes have some resistance to cracking and a nice flavor. Developed by Merlyn Neidens, a respected seed researcher and developer.
Yellow Pear TY122  $2.50
Very sweet, 1 1/2-inch yellow, pear-shaped fruit have a mild flavor and are great for fresh eating or for making tomato preserves. Very productive plants are easy to grow. One of the first tomatoes I grew as a child.

First Grown in 2010

Al-Kuffa TM190  $2.50
This little tomato is early and produces 3-4 ounce fruit on compact, dwarf vines that yielded till frost. We received this mild-tasting Iraqi variety from our friend Aziz Nail who said, “Delicious one, useful for any purpose, strong bush plant cultivated in the south of Iraq in cool greenhouses for late spring or early summer markets. Also it is [grown] in the middle and north Iraq without greenhouse.”

Horizon Herbs

Doucet’s Plum $2.45
Annual heirloom. Indeterminate vine. This was both the first and last tomato that we harvested, producing all season long, a salad tomato of medium size, excellent consistency and taste. Highly recommended and one of our favorites. Cultivation: Sow 60 days prior to last frost. Sow in a flat in a very shallow furrow, barely cover seeds, tamp securely, and keep flat evenly moist, warm and in the light. Thin seedlings to 2 inches apart and grow to second set of leaves. Give strong light and warmth. Protect from frost. Prick out to larger pots to produce a robust transplant. Plant in rich soil in full sun and stake or trellis. Water deeply and infrequently.
Stupice $2.45
A Czech heirloom cultivar pronounced (“Stoo-PEECH-ka”) Annual. 65 days to maturity.  Vigorous and indeterminate vines with wide leaves that look like the leaves of potatoes. Very cold tolerant cultivar produces early tomatoes and keeps going until frost. We found the 2 inch, rounded fruits to be tangy and tasty–a good slicing tomato that holds up well for market (which is a bit unusual for an heirloom). Cultivation: Sow 60 days prior to last frost. Sow in a flat in a very shallow furrow, barely cover seeds, tamp securely, and keep flat evenly moist, warm and in the light. Thin seedlings to 2 inches apart and grow to second set of leaves. Give strong light and warmth. Protect from frost. Prick out to larger pots to produce a robust transplant. Plant 2 to 3 feet apart in rich soil in full sun and stake or trellis. Water deeply and infrequently.
Chadwick Cherry $3.95
Vining annual to 3 feet. The late Alan Chadwick was a great man and full of heart and wit. He was the originator of the biointensive gardening method and also bred this incredible tomato, which was consumed with great lust by himself and his students at UC Santa Cruz. Bright red, large sized cherry tomatoes are produced early in the season. They are presented as sturdy clusters of 6. We rate this tomato 5 out of a possible 5 on the basis of taste. Excellent consumed fresh or halved and sun-dried. These are very easy to work with when dehydrating as they dry fast but are large enough to give substantial return. Cultivation: Sow 60 days prior to last frost. Sow in a flat in a very shallow furrow, barely cover seeds, tamp securely, and keep flat evenly moist, warm and in the light. Thin seedlings to 2 inches apart and grow to second set of leaves. Give strong light and warmth. Protect from frost. Prick out to larger pots to produce a robust transplant. Plant in rich soil in full sun and stake or trellis. Water deeply and infrequently.

First Grown in 2010

Crimson Sprinter $2.45
Annual, making a semi-determinate, self-supporting vine. We chose these as our main slicing tomato offering for a legion of reasons. The fruits are bountiful, bright red, midsized, have a very high lycopine content, and are very, very tasty. The plants perform well in cool conditions, and the fruits mature early. This means that for those of us who equate the start of summer with the smell of ripe tomato, well, we get a longer summer when we grow Crimson Sprinters. The reason they’re called sprinters is because they sprint to the finish line. They were developed in Canada, a land where people like to sprint, especially on ice, of which they are very well endowed. Sow in the early spring, about 6 weeks before the last frost. Sow in flats in the greenhouse, cold frame, or (very) sunny window, then individuate seedlings and transplant up to larger pots as time, pots, and potting soil allow. Use a very rich mix, containing plenty of compost or composted manure. When the soil in the garden has truly warmed up, transplant your babies out into the full sun, and give them at least 2 feet between the plants, or they will self-shade and produce scanty fruit. Each little green orb needs to develop a personal relationship with El Sol in the sky if they really want to run red down our chins by midsummer. Ah, the life of a tomato. Let us all be like that–green, then ripe, then eaten (and never subjected to rot).
 

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